The Colorado State Seal

Colorado State Seal

 

 

Contents
Use of the Colorado State Seal

History and description


Use of the Colorado State Seal

The design of the Colorado State Seal is described in the Colorado Revised Statutes [1]. The Secretary of State is the custodian of the seal and is responsible for its safekeeping.  In addition to having the authority to use the seal and place it on documents, the Secretary of State is also responsible for monitoring use of the seal. [2]   Using the seal illegally is a class 5 felony. [3]

Rules for using the Colorado State Seal:

  1. The actual seal itself, measuring two and one-half inches in diameter, can only be used by the Secretary of State in an official capacity.
  2. A copy of the seal that is any size except two and one-half inches in diameter can be used by an agency, organization or group that is authorized or established by an arm of the State of Colorado for official state functions, or for educational purposes.
  3. The seal cannot be used by any private organization, business, or political organization.

Requests to use the Colorado State Seal must be submitted to Colorado State Seal Requests in writing.  We will grant or deny the request based on the guidelines listed above.

If you believe that someone is using the seal improperly or without authorization, you can report it to our office.

Guidelines for members of the Colorado General Assembly (PDF)



History and Description

The Colorado State Seal was adapted from the Territorial Seal that was adopted by Joint Resolution of the First Territorial Assembly on November 6, 1861. The statutory provision for the official seal of statehood was provided for by Act of the First General Assembly of the State of Colorado, approved on March 15, 1877.

By statute, the Seal of the State is two and one-half inches in diameter with the following device inscribed: A heraldic shield, the upper portion of which depicts three snowcapped mountains with clouds surrounding them; the lower part consists of a miner's badge, as prescribed by the rules of heraldry; as a crest above the shield, the eye of God with rays proceeding from the lines of a triangle; below the crest, and above the shield, as a scroll, is the Roman "fasces" which is a bundle of sticks with an axe blade projecting, bound by a band imprinted with the words, "Union and Constitution"; below the whole motto, "Nil Sine Numine," which commonly translated means "Nothing Without Providence"; the whole is surrounded by the words, "State of Colorado," and the figures "1876," the year of Colorado's statehood.

The official colors of the seal, fixed by a 1976 Executive Order, are as follows:

Red: The sky behind the mountains, the single band with the word "UNION" and the ring containing the words "STATE OF COLORADO, 1876".

White: The snowcaps of the three mountains, the clouds surrounding the mountains, the band with the word "AND", the banner containing the words "NIL SINE NUMINE", the triangle of the Eye of God, the fasces, and innermost ring.

Dark Blue: The mountains, the background behind the shield, the single band with the word "CONSTITUTION", and the six stars dividing the year of statehood from the lettering "STATE OF COLORADO", the two dots separating the words "STATE OF COLORADO".

Gold: The Eye of God, the rays emanating from the Eye, the background in the lower shield, the small decorative circles on the innermost white ring, and the ring situated between the red ring and outer silver ring of the seal.

Silver: The outside ring of the seal, the lettering "STATE OF COLORADO" and "1876", the axe head, the heads of both miner's tools, the two bands binding the fasces behind the two bands entitled "UNION" "CONSTITUTION", the outline of the shield, and the dividing line between the upper and lower portions of the shield.

Brown: The handles of the miner's tools, the handle of the axe.

Black: The lettering of the words "UNION", "AND", "CONSTITUTION", the words "NIL SINE NUMINE", the outline tracing the cascade of the banner containing the words "NIL SINE NUMINE", the outlines encircling the small decorative circles on the innermost white circle, and the outlines of the single band "AND".


 

[1] 24-80-901, C.R.S.
[2] 24-80-903, C.R.S.
[3] 24-80-902, C.R.S.



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